Connecting Beogram 4002 to Beosound Core

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #30589
    Mjoelnir
    BRONZE Member
      • Topics Started 1
      • Total Posts 9

      Hello everyone,

      I am very new to B&O systems, I have only just bought a pair of Beolab 18s which are connceted via cable and an RJ45/2x8pin adapter to a Besound Core.

      Now I have auctioned a Beogram 4002. First I need to install a needle and mount an internal RIAA preamp (the “easy no soldering installation” thing). After that, I wonder what’s the best way to connect the Beogram to the Core. As I notice, there is only a limited number of connection ports on the Core. Do you have any suggestions?

      Also, I wonder what will be the best way to adjust volume: On the Beogram itself or via B&O App. Will the Beogram even show up as an external device?

      #30593
      Millemissen
      BRONZE Member
        • Flensborg————Danmark
        • Topics Started 21
        • Total Posts 1,025

        Hi Mjoelnir

        The BS Core has one input port, which is combined mini-jack analog and toslink.

        In your case you will only need an adapter cable between the turntable and a male minijack connector.

        There is no option to control the volume on a Beogram itself (the output is fixed) – this is done in the Core.

        Once you have connected it there, the Core turns on to that input (i.e. autosense), when the turntable has started.
        You can use the B&O app for volume controlling like with all other sources like B&O Radio etc.

        The turntable will show up as an AUX-connected device.
        You will not be able to remote control the turntable (pause, play etc) – that must be done on the turntable.

        Alternatively you can control the volume with the Beoremote One, an Essence Remote or the Halo remote.

        MM

        #30606
        Mark-sf
        BRONZE Member
          • Topics Started 0
          • Total Posts 294

          FYI, you are not limited to an internal phono preamp if you have trouble finding one. You can use and inexpensive Project Box or Schiit Mani and actually get better sound.

          #31578
          Mjoelnir
          BRONZE Member
            • Topics Started 1
            • Total Posts 9

            Thank you for your reply and your suggestions. As I am very knew to the audio world, could you perhaps explain to me why these preamps make better sound than an internal RIAA preamp? Is the difference big? I really like the idea of having one single device without a separate preamp including power cable etc., but I cannot estimate what the difference in sound quality might be.

            #31620
            Mark-sf
            BRONZE Member
              • Topics Started 0
              • Total Posts 294

              Sound quality will be more a function of the cartridge and speakers you are using versus the preamp. To get an internal one you’ll need to spend around $400 where a decent external one can be had for $100+.

              #31632
              Mark
              BRONZE Member
                • Topics Started 5
                • Total Posts 134

                As I am very knew to the audio world, could you perhaps explain to me why these preamps make better sound than an internal RIAA preamp? Is the difference big?

                A quick disclaimer, my figures are based off a Google search.

                The need for a phono preamp:

                Signal levels for a phono output will range between 0.0002 Volt and 0.007 Volt.

                The standard CD-player output voltage is 2V RMS, with units varying between 1.74V on the low side and a whopping 7.2V on the high side.

                Job 1 of a phono preamp is to amplify the very small phono output to be around the 2V RMS of a CD player to have adequate volume when sending the signal to the amplifier.  The phono preamp should do this without introducing noise or distortion to the signal.

                Job 2 of a phono preamp is to apply the RIAA EQ curve to the phono signal, ensuring that your records sound balanced and accurate.

                The RIAA EQ curve boosts the bass and treble frequencies to compensate for the inherent roll-off of these frequencies that occurs during the recording and playback process.

                The better the cartridge the better the phono preamp should be to get the most out of the cartridge.  It all depends how “picky” you want to be when you listen to records.  I’m sure an internal phono preamp can be quite good depending on who is making it and what their standards are.

                 

              Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
              • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.